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Wilderness Adventures - September Week 2

This is about a remote area in west central British Columbia, Canada called the West Chilcotin. Surrounded by numerous glacial mountain ranges, alpine lakes teeming with wild Rainbow Trout, and full of wildlife. Living here goes from no running water or electricity to spacious log homes with all the conveniences and without the smog!
If you would like to see pictures of wildlife, mountains, lakes, exciting snowmobiling, events and more, and read stories like 'Lake Monsters' - just go into Archives on the lower left side of this page.
15/09/2005 9:09 PM

Cowboy Architecture

Our cowboys of old managed to add flare even to old cattle chutes. Wood was something that was abundant in the West Chilcotin, while metal was heavy and awkward to cart over rutted wheel tracks from Williams Lake to to points west. As a result, you'll see a lot of old buildings made of logs that didn't require nails to hold them together, nor did they require sawmilling. An axe sufficed to flatten the sides and carve the ends so that one log could sit flush on another to form a reasonably weathertight building. Fences, round pens and chutes were made much the same way. Where metal was required to attach one log to another, more often than not, wire was used because it went a lot further for its weight than nails and didn't require carrying a hammer. The Russell or Buckfence on the right uses wire to suspend the poles under the teepee like supports, but I have seen fences similarly styled in this country that require no nails or wire that are still standing to this day. The same goes for the Snake fence. The one in the photo to the right is similar but not exactly like the snake because it requires wire or a small pole to hold the tops and bottoms of the support together, while a true snake fence is one log piled on top of the next like a log house, alternating at the corners and is angled from side to side, hence its name. This kind of fence requires no nails or wire, can make use of huge logs and can last for years. Something else that you still see here and there and many over a hundred years old, are sod houses. First settlers to the area with winter coming on fast found it easiest to dig into a dirt bank, line the sides, top and face with logs, and build a roof of dirt overtop. Though usually tiny, the sod house proved to be windproof, predator proof, reasonably warm with even a small amount of heat and was called home by many for the first few winters. Even though living in this region could be a day to day struggle for survival, early settlers still found time to take pride in their architecture and add a whimsical twist wherever possible.
14/09/2005 4:49 PM

Fall

Autumn has definitely arrived with a bang. Aspen that were green only a few days ago are bright yellow, red and orange. The shrubs and low growing kinnickinick or bearberry are turning color and sporting bright red berries. Birds of all sorts are flitting among the grasses collecting seeds. There's lots of feed for birds and wildlife this year. The rainy summer has given a real boost to everything. It's not every year that you see cattle and horses belly deep in wild grass and the coats that I've seen on bears in the last few weeks are shiny and healthy looking. A lot of the ranchers are haying now, hoping and praying it won't rain on their crops. And no wonder. I don't think I've ever seen greener or thicker piles of hay in my life! Normally a time of bounty in other parts of the country, summer is winding down for us and we're deep into fall. Unless we get a long Indian Summer, which is more than possible, we could see snow on the ground any day now. I look every day to see if there's snow on the mountains yet. Over the past few weeks there's been fresh snow on and off on the Rainbow Mountains and the Ulkatcho/Itcha Mountains. There was even a dusting on Kappan and Razorback the other morning. Fishing in the area is excellent and anglers have been doing really well for rainbow trout in Nimpo Lake. Abundant feed from the rains this year has made the trout really thick and fat. The salmon fishing has been excellent as well and I have a mouthwatering Coho in my freezer that I can't wait to cook up. Lots of camouflage gear walking around indicates that the hunters are in for moose, caribou, deer and bear. One would like to think this is the season that you take a deep breath and relax after a busy summer. But no, it's time to get in the winter's wood and meat supply, get non-winterzed cabins shut down, water lines drained and everything cleaned up before the snow flies and the ground freezes. Then it's winter recreation time! Snowmobiling, cross country skiing, or skating on the lake ice. Check out our Winter Activities and come join us for a winter wonderland vacation!
13/09/2005 12:32 PM

New Property for Sale Listing

I have a new property listing for you to check out if you're in the market for waterfront property. The property is 6.7 acres located on the long arm of Nimpo Lake with 340' of lake frontage and a spectacular view of the Coastal Mountain range. The house is built into the hill overlooking the lakeshore with extra glass facing the lake, upper and lower Patios, custom made contoured plank doors, 2 bedrooms and a den/bedroom upstairs. There is a small workshop, laundry room, pantry, and large family room downstairs. The house is equipped with an economical woodstove and a Propane Furnace. The basement walls are double 2x6 walls (12" thick). The Master Bedroom has phone, TV and a walk-in closet. The kitchen has an in-counter mixmaster. The house has a Central Vacuum System. The downstairs Patio has 220v wiring for a Hot Tub and extra lights. There are rock facings in the living room and downstairs patio wall. The house has both Starchoice and C Band Satellite dishes. The cabin is fully equipped with complete kitchen & bathroom facilities and insulated for winter. It measures about 530 Sq. Ft. The log two-car garage has a workbench and two lofts for storage. It has a cement floor and some electrical. The log workshop is fully insulated and has a separate car space that is double insulated and drywalled for dustcontrol. The attic is used for storage. the workshop has a woodstove for heating. The electrical power supply is 220v. The drywall side of the workshop has a cement floor and the workshop side has both insulated wood and polished cement flooring. Both have double pane glass. Workshop side has an insulated sliding door and the other has an insulated roll-up door. The property has all the grounds cleared and fully treed with up to 24" trees. There are two options to purchase this property;
1. Buy complete, including furnishings $420,000
2. Buy half the property - House, workshop, corrals, 2car garage for $320,000
or buy the Cabin side for $160,000
Owner will do the subdividing at his cost and the survey has already been completed. For more information and pictures go to the Properties for Sale Page.

11/09/2005 3:19 PM

Moose Hunting

Something not approved of by everyone, but a necessity for many in the Chilcotin. It isn't a subject I will bring up much simply because so many urbanites have a lack of understanding or sympathy for the roots of hunting for meat. However, across many of the provinces of Canada and north to the territories and Alaska, hunting is often one of necessity. Here in the Chilcotin, many families, both aboriginal and otherwise would be going without meat of any kind if they were unable to hunt for it because it just isn't affordable for them at the grocery stores. The same applies to me. There are many years in my past where I would have had no meat on the table at all had I been unable to hunt. Although I can afford to buy meat now, hunting for it is a tradition that I enjoy, I like the taste and health benefits of wild meat, and it still helps out the grocery budget. We're blessed with an abundance of big game animals here and a very strict limited entry hunting policy in the region designed to maintain healthy game populations. Yesterday was the first day of hunting for me because I have a limited entry tag for bull moose for September. The cool part is that it is for the local area; my old stomping grounds before limited entry hunting was brought in for the region, and an area that I know well for hunting. Well, did. That was many years ago so I spent a few hours yesterday trying to find old trails that I used to walk into to reach the meadows that moose like to hang out in. Fifteen years makes a lot of difference to how much a trail has grown over and to my memory. We did see a nice black bear and her two cubs cross the road in front of us though. Unfortunately, by the time I could get the camera out and take a picture, she was deep in the woods. You can just see the black of the mother in the picture on the right. She is behind the trees to the right where she has stopped to put her cubs between her and us. They're the little bit of black you can see in the left side of the picture. Totally unlike the bears underneath that were on the side of the highway in the Bella Coola Valley last Sunday. Those bears are very accustomed to people stopping and taking their pictures.
I've started a new week, so if you would like to see all the great animal pics from last week you'll find it here at September 1 .



The purpose of this web site is to draw attention to a remote area of west central British Columbia. It is a beautiful area that relies heavily on tourism. The search engines don't know much about the West Chilcotin, Anahim Lake, Nimpo Lake or any of the other small communities in the region and I hope to change that! Even as large as this site will eventually be, there just isn't enough room or time in the day to fully describe this incredible country but I am going to try scraping away at the tip of the iceberg, so join me!


Follow the links, and see what the West Chilcotin is really like!
An old cattle chute in the woods is crowned by an interesting piece of wood
 
A pole fence commonly called the Russell or Buckfence
 
A newer version of the snake fence
 
Fall arrives in the Kleena Kleene valley
 
Log house for sale on Nimpo Lake
 
Black Bear mother and cubs are quickly camaflouged in the woods
 
Totally different are the less shy black bears of Tweedsmuir Park
 
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