Anahim/Nimpo Lake BC
Chilcotin Waterfront Resort and Motel advertising banner
Canoeing in the Chilcotin
Index
 Welcome to Anahim Lake & Nimpo Lake, British Columbia
  Accommodations
  Home
  Attractions
  Business Directory
  Fuel
  Regions 
  Other 

Back to Daily Blog
Archives
December 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
November 2005
Week1
Week2
October 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
September 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
August 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
July 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
June 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
May 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
April 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
March 2005
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
February 2005
January 2005



[Valid RSS]



Wilderness Adventures - October Week 1

This is about a remote area in west central British Columbia, Canada called the West Chilcotin. Surrounded by numerous glacial mountain ranges, alpine lakes teeming with wild Rainbow Trout, and full of wildlife. Living here goes from no running water or electricity to spacious log homes with all the conveniences and without the smog!
If you would like to see pictures of wildlife, mountains, lakes, exciting snowmobiling, events and more, and read stories like 'Lake Monsters' - just go into Archives on the lower left side of this page.
07/10/2005 11:22 PM

The Tree Thing

You see a lot of different things now because of the beetle. Our British Columbia politicians as well as federal have begun to understand that the Mountain Pine Beetle is going to have a devastating effect on the provincial economy from lumber and everything subsidiary to a possible tourism impact. Although that last point is a telling one. I, among many would have expected a more negative reaction from vacationers this summer because of the beetle infestation in lodgepole pine along Highway 20 that we all find devastating because it's so obvious to us. But heck, we live here! Most of the visitors to the area noticed it, and commented on it, but really didn't seem to think it was that big a deal other than they were very curious as to what had caused the red needled pine trees. Upon learning, they were very sympathetic and supportive, but it kind of brought real life to our door. Are we making a way bigger deal of this than need be? From a tourism point of view, very possibly. From a forestry point of view? No. A lot of forestry dependent towns in BC are going to be hurting pretty badly for the next few years, or even for generations.
But there is the good side! Firewood is more readily available, and since we all rely heavily on wood for heating, and the price of fuel has risen to increase the cost of going to get firewood, near accessibility is a good thing. What's not a good thing is the beetle killed trees falling on the power line. And that is going to become a very common thing. A few days ago we were without power for several hours in early evening because of a beetle-kill tree on the powerline. Aside from losing all my inbox email on my computer, the power outage did little damage because we're all used to them. Our power comes from huge diesel generators mounted on semi truck trailers in Anahim Lake but our service and fix-it guys come from Bella Coola, so sometimes it can be hours before our power is back up and running.
When the government gives numbers about the eventual impact of the beetle I wonder if they take into consideration all the possible aspects. Power outages may be only one of those 'hidden' impacts.

06/10/2005 11:31 PM

Loon Gather

The young loons are gathered up and hanging out together. The parents are long since gone but the young hang around for at least another month putting on size, practising flying, and putting on a little muscle I guess. It takes a little while, but the young tend to gather first in pairs, then in groups. Maybe that's when they start learning how to socialize outside of family or they've learned that it's best to be in a group for protection. Today, I could hear a loon crying over in another bay. A bald eagle was dive bombing it on a regular basis trying to drive it under water enough times to drown it. A few times the loon's yodel was cut off mid sound and I wondered if the eagle had gotten it, but no, you'd hear it again after the loon rose back to the surface and see the eagle continue his bombing attacks. Eventually it tired of the game and left the loon alone. I'm really hoping it didn't drown it. The eagle landed in a tree nearby and it didn't look like it had anything in its claws so hopefully all is well. That particular loon is from our bay on the short arm of Nimpo Lake and seems to be the only one with a sickly kind of call, easily recognizable and unlike the sounds of any of the others. For some reason the bald eagles singled out this one and its parents and tormented them all summer. The eagles got its sibling early on but this one has survived so far. Cruel world out there.
Lots of snow on the Itcha and Ilkatchuz mountains by this evening because it rained all afternoon at lower elevations. Fall is is shaping up into winter!

05/10/2005 8:28 PM

The Adventures of Dave and Margaret

What do you do when your vehicle gets stuck in the middle of a meadow and you're in your seventies? Why, you try to dig it out of course. I have some amazing neighbours that live one property over from ours and they both really like to hunt. Dave's moose season started on the first of October and already the cows and bulls are pairing up for mating season, so it's a good time to be out there.
Yesterday the neighbours went out for a hunt in an area that another neighbour across the lake had seen a big bull hanging out in. All was going fine until they tried to cross a meadow at about 5:30 last night and sank halfway up their wheels in black slough mud. They were good and truly stuck and no amount of jacking up the vehicle, putting boughs under the wheels, shoveling or using a 'comealong' was going to move it. The comealong might have worked but they had only fine rope that stretched too much and so they couldn't get the winch to pull enough on the SUV to move it. Finally, after getting wet nearly to their waists, they slogged out of the swamp and down the slippery, rutted trail toward Nimpo Lake. It took them awhile of walking in the dark but they got to Chilcotin's Gate Restaurant where they called us for a ride home. A little effort and winching this morning and Dave had his SUV out of where it had been stuck, but now that it was out, he had to turn around and roar back through the swamp where he had just come from to get back to the road. He sat at the top of a little rise gunning the engine in 4 wheel drive imagining that he had better drive like Mario Andretti or he wasn't going to get back through. (See the middle picture on the right). He nailed the gas and away he came pushing a wake of mud in front of his wheels trying to keep up his momentum. He just about powered out on a tiny rise coming out of the swamp but he made it none the worse for wear other than his vehicle was in dire need of a wash.
How many couples in their mid-seventies do you know that would be out hunting an animal at least four times their combined weight, slogging through swamp trying to get a vehicle unstuck, then down a trail in the dark on foot headed for home? Amazing. I hope I'm that young when I get older!

04/10/2005 8:54 PM

Printer Hunt

It's gotten in the way of writing about more exciting things, like living in the West Chilcotin. I apologize for that. But sometimes those mundane things in life just seem to get in the way.
A high quality printer is a necessity to my graphics business and I've been spending an inordinate amount of time researching the Internet to find the one I want. Because the one I am using at the time to meet a deadline usually calves at the worst possible moment I've decided to get a jump on karma, bad luck, lady luck or whatever it is that causes things to go boom and die just when you need them most. Prior to this I've always used inkjets for my business because they are most cost effective for quality in photographic reproduction. But they're also a real pain in the nether region, especially when they break down at the most inopportune time. Ink cartridges are also expensive and running a business inkjet with separate print heads is a must. The other downside is that the ink is not waterproof, so I often laminate what I produce, especially materials that may be exposed to moisture.
In the last few years color laser printers have been coming down in price and are no longer a prohibitive purchase for the small business owner. That's not to say they're cheap. I'm still looking at between $1600 and $5500 Canadian dollars to own one, and more yet to operate one. However, in the long run it may more than pay for itself in the lower cost of ink, higher output, and not having to waterproof the materials by laminating them.
The remarkable thing about the whole exercise is discovering the awesome power of the Internet. I should know better because I'm on it every day... I build web sites and research for search engine optimization all the time. I don't often have time to just shop but the amazing part is that when you do want to look, you'll find it. And then some!
No more sending out to companies for information, spending hours on the phone or driving some distance and spending hours in stores trying to figure out the best buy for your money and needs all the while fighting off over eager salespeople. It has the added advantage of allowing you to research reviews from business owners and working Joes all over North America who have already made the purchase you're considering. It's a great way to find out whether the product you're considering is the right one for you or has bugs, problems or even that you can't get decent tech service from the company you're considering buying from.
There is no question that the Internet is an amazing time saver when you are looking to make a large purchase.
I'll let you know in a year or so if I made the right decision based on Internet information on the product I choose.

03/10/2005 10:24 PM

Running Battle With Beavers

The incredible destructive ability of the beaver can be a huge problem. I was reminded of our annual running battle this morning when I saw a beaver slowly rolling by in the water in front of the house. Fall and spring are both bad times with fall being the worst because young beavers kicked out of the lodge are looking for a spot to build their new home and set up house keeping while adults are intent on putting in the winter's food supply which usually consists of a whole lot of trees! Right now, we can ill afford to lose our aspen and willow to marauding beaver when the surrounding landscape is going to be stripped bare of pines from the mountain pine beetle.
I realize that most people, especially urban folk, consider the beaver to be a cute, hardworking animal that means no harm to anyone. There's no question that the beaver is one hardworking engineer, but he's an extremely destructive one in more ways than one. In building a lodge and filling his underwater food bin annually, it doesn't take very many beaver very long to completely denude the landscape of every deciduous tree and shrub. I know, I've watched it happen in Saskatchewan and the resulting devastation is horrible. And believe it or not, the beaver will continue to denude his surroundings until he is forced to move on, or dies out from disease because of overpopulation. In addition to chewing down all the trees, they build dams to raise water levels. In many isolated swamps and meadows the resulting damage may not be measurable because it is in a remote location and may not affect anyone directly. But here on Nimpo Lake, we are very much affected. Or our fish stocks are. The beaver are very bad for damming up Willy's Creek and Nimpo Creek, both of which run into Nimpo Lake. They also like to dam up the Dean River in several places, including where the Dean leaves Nimpo Lake. The result? Completely blocking spawning Rainbow trout, causing serious environmental impact on Nimpo Lake.
Their dams slow the movement of freshening water and has resulted in very high concentrations of the Giardia bacteria, or the disease known as Beaver Fever.
The interesting part about all this is that the beaver was completely wiped out of the province of British Columbia in the early part of the 20th century from overtrapping. Some folks got together mid century and decided that the province needed beavers again and brought in beavers from the prairies that were not actually the same species as had initially populated the province. I've often wondered if that is why they are so prolific and troublesome now, or is it because their natural predators are now few and far between? There are far fewer wolves in the country and if you can believe everything you read, that was the beaver's main enemy. Now we are.

02/10/2005 7:51 PM

Smelling Snow

Time to clean up everything in the yard that might be buried. Snow laden clouds have been swirling around the mountains all day to the point that they've disappeared from view the last few hours. The air is really cool today even with spots of sun. The wind has been out of the east and I smell snow on the air. Went around today picking up anything I didn't want to see buried and frozen in for the winter and moved some aged manure onto the perennial plants before it froze too much to move. Tried to start the lawn mower in hopes of getting the 'lawns' trimmed down to a manageable height before winter hits. I use the term lawns loosely of course, because they consist mostly of wild grasses and wildflowers intermixed with a few obnoxious weeds. If you call dandelion and wild rose weeds. I do. Out here anything goes, especially if you like natural but I don't like dandelions, never did, never will and especially don't like them because they are not natural to North America. Or they weren't before the first settlers brought them over. Anyway, the poor old lawn mower got rained on one too many times this summer and just didn't want to turn over. Maybe she'll feel a little differently tomorrow. Then again, if there's snow on the ground, maybe not. That's ok, I can always use the weedeater on whatever sticks out above the snow...lawn manicure Chilcotin style!
This is the start of a new week, so all the stories from last week are at September4


The purpose of this web site is to draw attention to a remote area of west central British Columbia. It is a beautiful area that relies heavily on tourism. The search engines don't know much about the West Chilcotin, Anahim Lake, Nimpo Lake or any of the other small communities in the region and I hope to change that! Even as large as this site will eventually be, there just isn't enough room or time in the day to fully describe this incredible country but I am going to try scraping away at the tip of the iceberg, so join me!


Follow the links, and see what the West Chilcotin is really like!
A swamp holds a nasty, muddy surprise for the driver of this SUV
 
He finally pulled himself through to the other side, now he has to go full speed to get back to this side.
 
Mario Andretti II at the wheel of this tiny red SUV as it pushes up a wave of mud before it!
 
The beaver in the area though 'cute' can be highly destructive
 
Gorgeous fall days mean great fishing in the West Chilcotin
 
Fresh snow on the mountains above  Nimpo Lake
This web site designed by Vector North Web Design